Skip UM navigation Skip to Main Navigation

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


The Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy operate on both the Oxford and Jackson campuses. The Schools of Dentistry, Health Related Professionals and Medicine, and the Health Sciences Graduate School, are based in Jackson only. (Additional healthcare programs are available through the School of Applied Sciences on the Oxford campus.) Other than these exceptions, the schools above are on the Oxford campus.

B.A. in Religious Studies

Degree Requirements

The academic regulations for this degree program, as entered in the University of Mississippi Catalog, are in effect for the current or selected academic year and semester. The University of Mississippi reserves the right to 1) change or withdraw courses; 2) change rules for registration, instruction, and graduation; and 3) change other regulations affecting the student body at any time.

General Education

Requirement Hours Description
First Year Writing I 3 Complete Engl 101, Hon 101, Writ 100 or Writ 101 with a passing grade.
First Year Writing II 3 Complete one of the following courses with a passing grade: Engl 102, Liba 102, Writ 102 or Hon 102.
6 hrs literature survey 6 Complete 6 hours of literature survey with a passing grade. Choose from the following courses: Engl 221, Engl 222, Engl 223, Engl 224, Engl 225, or Engl 226.
6 hrs modern/ancient language 200+ 6 Successfully complete at least 6 hours at the 200 level or above in one modern or ancient language.
6 hrs history 6 Complete 6 hours in History (HIS) course work with a passing grade.
3 hrs humanities 3 Successfully complete 3 hours in one of the following areas: African-American studies; classical civilization; environmental studies (Envs 101); gender studies (G St 201, 301, 333, 350); philosophy; religion; Southern studies (S St 101, 102). In addition, gender studies courses that are cross-listed with African American studies, classical civilization, English, modern languages, philosophy, or religion courses will satisfy this requirement.
6 hrs social science 6 Successfully complete 6 semester hours in anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, or sociology.
3 hrs fine arts 3 Complete 3 hours in the area of fine or performing arts. Choose from art history, music, dance, and theatre arts. Studio and workshop courses cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. Acceptable freshman or sophommore-level courses are: AH 101, AH 102, AH 201, AH 202; Music 101, Music 102, Music 103, Music 104, Music 105; Dance 200; and Theatre 201.
3 hrs math 100+ 3 Successfully complete 3 hours of Math at the 100 level or above except for Math 245 and Math 246.
9-12 hrs science 9 Complete a full year of science course work in one subject area (6-8 hrs) and complete 3 credit hours in a subject area from another department. Courses may be chosen from the departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geology and Geological Engineering, or Physics and Astronomy. Note that a student taking the required 6 hours of one subject (astronomy or physics) from the Department of Physics and Astronomy must take the remaining 3 hours from another department.
2 associated science labs 2 Successfully complete at least two science laboratory courses.

Major Requirements

Requirement Hours Description
Rel 102 3 Rel 102: Introduction to Asian Religions
Rel 103 3 Rel 103: Intro to Judaism, Christianity and Islam
Rel 497 3 Rel 497: Advanced Seminar in Religious Studies
Rel 310, 312, 327, 352, 353 3 Rel 312: The New Testament & Early Christianity, Rel 370: Topics in Biblical Studies, Rel 327: Sacred Texts in Islam, Rel 310: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Rel 308, 311, 320, 325, 353, Inst 343 3 Rel 353: Sacred Texts in East Asian Religions, Rel 320: Hinduism, Inst 343: Religion, the State & Conflict in Asia, Rel 325: Chinese Religions: Confucianism & Daoism, Rel 311: Women and the Goddess in Asian Religions, Rel 308: Buddhism
Rel electives 15 Rel 395: Topics in Religious Studies, Rel 100: Intro to Religion, Rel 207: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 362: Peoples of Near East, Rel 406: Research in Religions, Rel 408: History of the Bible, Rel 521: Near East Myth/Insrptn, His 385: Hist of East Asia, Rel 202: Christian Ethics, Rel 205: World Religions, Rel 307: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 433: Arch of Old Testament, Rel 435: Arch of New Testament, Rel 443: Sociology of Religion, Rel 386: Religion and Film, Rel 384: Religion and Renunciation, Rel 378: Global Christianity, Rel 210: Old Testament Thought, Rel 211: New Testament Thought, Rel 305: Old Testament Thought, Rel 306: New Testament Thought, Rel 308: Con Protestant Thought, Rel 341: Early Amer Relig Hist, Rel 342: Mod Amer Relig Hist, Rel 405: Research in Religions, Rel 411: Major Christian Theolo, Anth 404: Southern Folklore, Anth 323: Indians of North America, Anth 327: Indians of South America, Rel 353: Sacred Texts in East Asian Religions, Rel 371: Christianity, Rel 101: Introduction to Religion, Rel 303: Religion in the South, Rel 312: The New Testament & Early Christianity, Rel 319: United States Religious History, Rel 320: Hinduism, Rel 322: Chinese Religions, Rel 345: Religion & Politics, Rel 351: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 360: Philosophical Issues: Science & Religion, Rel 399: Topics in Religion Abroad, Rel 490: Directed Readings in Religion, Rel 501: Seminar, Rel 503: Major Issues in Southern Religion, Rel 110: Biblical Hebrew I, Rel 111: Biblical Hebrew II, Rel 300: Comparative World Religions, Rel 370: Topics in Biblical Studies, Rel 372: Rise of Christianity, Rel 387: Religious Ethics: Issues and Methods, Rel 368: Feminism, Women, and Religion, Rel 358: Religious Implications of the Holocaust, Rel 380: Community-Based Internship, Rel 323: Islam, Rel 379: Christianity in Africa, Hst 310: History of Medieval Christianity, Hst 311: Medieval Church and Empire, Hst 319: Reformation Europe, Hst 375: History of Islam in Africa, Hst 434: US Religious History, Hst 455: History of Religion in the South, Rel 404: Oriental Religion, Rel 431: Arch of Old Testament, Rel 366: Sex, Gender, and the Bible, AH 332: Early Christian, Byzantine & Islamic Art, Engl 427: Medieval Drama, Rel 375: History of Medieval Christianity, Rel 356: Women in the Rabbinic Tradition, AH 330: Medieval Art, Rel 373: Ancient Christianity, Eng 376: Studies in Asian Literature, Clc 327: Greek and Roman Religions, Rel 326: Saints and Sexuality, Anth 308: Archaeology of Death and Burial, Rel 350: Judaism, Rel 352: Rabbinic Literature, Rel 325: Chinese Religions: Confucianism & Daoism, Anth 312: Muslims in the West, Rel 385: Western Mysticism, Rel 311: Women and the Goddess in Asian Religions, Rel 308: Buddhism, Rel 102: Introduction to Asian Religions, Rel 327: Sacred Texts in Islam, Rel 363: Religious Perspectives on Aging & Death, Rel 497: Advanced Seminar in Religious Studies, Rel 310: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, Rel 103: Intro to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Rel 388: Religion, Illness, and Healing, Rel 395: Topics in Religious Studies, Rel 100: Intro to Religion, Rel 207: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 362: Peoples of Near East, Rel 406: Research in Religions, Rel 408: History of the Bible, Rel 521: Near East Myth/Insrptn, Rel 202: Christian Ethics, Rel 205: World Religions, Rel 307: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 433: Arch of Old Testament, Rel 435: Arch of New Testament, Rel 443: Sociology of Religion, Rel 386: Religion and Film, Rel 384: Religion and Renunciation, Rel 378: Global Christianity, Rel 210: Old Testament Thought, Rel 211: New Testament Thought, Rel 305: Old Testament Thought, Rel 306: New Testament Thought, Rel 308: Con Protestant Thought, Rel 341: Early Amer Relig Hist, Rel 342: Mod Amer Relig Hist, Rel 405: Research in Religions, Rel 411: Major Christian Theolo, Rel 353: Sacred Texts in East Asian Religions, Rel 371: Christianity, Rel 101: Introduction to Religion, Rel 303: Religion in the South, Rel 312: The New Testament & Early Christianity, Rel 319: United States Religious History, Rel 320: Hinduism, Rel 322: Chinese Religions, Rel 345: Religion & Politics, Rel 351: Philosophy of Religion, Rel 360: Philosophical Issues: Science & Religion, Rel 399: Topics in Religion Abroad, Rel 490: Directed Readings in Religion, Rel 501: Seminar, Rel 503: Major Issues in Southern Religion, Rel 110: Biblical Hebrew I, Rel 111: Biblical Hebrew II, Rel 300: Comparative World Religions, Rel 370: Topics in Biblical Studies, Rel 372: Rise of Christianity, Rel 387: Religious Ethics: Issues and Methods, Rel 368: Feminism, Women, and Religion, Rel 358: Religious Implications of the Holocaust, Rel 380: Community-Based Internship, Rel 323: Islam, Rel 379: Christianity in Africa, Rel 404: Oriental Religion, Rel 431: Arch of Old Testament, Rel 366: Sex, Gender, and the Bible, Rel 375: History of Medieval Christianity, Rel 356: Women in the Rabbinic Tradition, Rel 373: Ancient Christianity, Rel 326: Saints and Sexuality, Rel 350: Judaism, Rel 352: Rabbinic Literature, Rel 325: Chinese Religions: Confucianism & Daoism, Rel 385: Western Mysticism, Rel 311: Women and the Goddess in Asian Religions, Rel 308: Buddhism, Rel 102: Introduction to Asian Religions, Rel 327: Sacred Texts in Islam, Rel 363: Religious Perspectives on Aging & Death, Rel 497: Advanced Seminar in Religious Studies, Rel 310: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, Rel 103: Intro to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Rel 388: Religion, Illness, and Healing
Overall Major GPA 0 Please contact your academic advisor for grade point requirements.
Resident Major GPA 0 Please contact your academic advisor for grade point requirements.
Rel St residency hrs 12 Student must earn at least 12 hours of their major courses in residence. A grade of C or hiher is required on all Religious Studies courses applied toward the degree.
The policies and regulations contained in this online University of Mississippi Catalog are in effect for the current or selected semester. The catalog is not a contract, but rather a guide for the convenience of students. The University of Mississippi reserves the right to 1) change or withdraw courses; 2) change the fees, rules, and schedules for admission, registration, instruction, and graduation; and 3) change other regulations affecting the student body at any time. Implicit in each student’s enrollment with the university is an agreement to comply with university rules and regulations, which the university may modify to exercise properly its educational responsibility.